Wild places

    This page enables you to search for some of the best places to see wildlife in Leicestershire and Rutland. It's not comprehensive but we will keep adding new sites as we get records and images. If you have a favourite site that you would like to see added, let us know.
    You can:

    • zoom into the map and click on any site to show its details below,
    • use the filters below to find sites in your district or parish,
    • type any part of the site name to search for a particular site.

    Just click on APPLY when you have entered your selection. Alternatively you can browse the full list below.

    Key: Wild Places (outlined in red); Public Rights of Way (green); county boundaries (blue), parish boundaries (lilac)

    Map Key: Wild Places (outlined in red); Public Rights of Way (green); VC55 boundary (blue)

    The wood, which covers 12 ha, is owned by the Wildlife Trust and is part of the Eye Brook Valley Woods Site of Special Scientific Interest. 

    Assessed in 2018 and designated a candidate Local Wildlife Site, Greetham Garage verge is located either side of the entrance to Greetham Garage, on Greetham Road by the A1. The verges are wide, flat by the road and banked up to the rear, backed by a tall Hawthorn hedge. The habitat is mostly calcareous grassland, and is species-rich, with wildflowers dominant over grasses. The site is mostly likely of recent origin due to alterations to the junction.

    Designated a Local Wildlife Site in 2003, Greetham verge is located on Thistleton Lane, leading up to Cottesmore Airfield. The site is approximately 1300 metres long, and included the verges on both sides of the road. The main habitats are mesotrophic grassland, calcareous grassland, and mixed grassland.

    Greetham Wood Far covers 33.6 hectaresand is planted ancient woodland on Glacial Boulder Clay and a small area of Northampton Sand ironstone.

    Greetham Wood Near and Far are the woods that border the A1 near Greetham and the Ram Jam Inn. They are both coniferous plantations and have forestry tracks to walk through. These woods are an important feature in the local landscape.

    These three woodlands make up an area of mixed aged trees, hedgerows, grasslands and open space.  Gresley Wood is a 42 hectare site with a history of farming and opencast mining. Tunnel Woods is community woodland and both of these sites are owned by the Forestry Commission. The neighbouring Princess Diana Wood is a developing woodland with excellent access and is owned by the National Forest Charitable Trust.

    Groby Pool is situated on the southern edge of the Charnwood Forest and is reputedly the largest natural expanse of open water in Leicestershire, covering 38 acres (15 ha). There was no mention of a lake in the Domesday Book, though it has been referred to since 1297. Research into the Lake sediments has confirmed that Groby Pool is of relatively recent origin. It may have resulted from the damming of Slate Brook in the 12th/13th century by the monks from Leicester abbey.

    This stretch of the canal runs south from Bosworth Tunnel to the county boundary. Just before the boundary, the Welford Arm of the canal branches off.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    This short spur of canal splits from the Leicester arm at Foxton locks and extends into Market Harborough.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    This section runs south-west from Mowsley Road towards Husbands Bosworth where it enters a long tunnel across the north of the village.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    At just 1.6km long, the Welford Arm transports you from the Leicester Line of the Grand Union Canal to the picturesque village of Welford. It lies just south of Husbands Bosworth and near to the county boundary.

    The main route of the Grand Union Canal, built between 1793 and 1814, is from London to Birmingham but it has several 'arms' including that which runs to Leicester and beyond into Nottinghamshire. This is a navigable route and has a public footpath (towpath) along the full length. As with most canals, the shallow water (typically around 1.2m) and shallower edges provides good habitat for emergent aquatic vegetation, which in turn supports a wide range of invertebrates.

    Mill Field Wood lies adjacent to the canal - a Woodland Trust site with good access.